1. Posted on
    Source
    carcomplaints.com
    Tagged
    #recall

    Land Rover's automatic high beams currently violate federal law because they don't indicate to the driver when they're active.

    There are 27,000 vehicles that need to be recalled to fix this problem. In theory, the automatic nature of the system should prevent any unintentional blinding of oncoming traffic. But drivers won't know one way or another until they get the fix.…

  2. Posted on
    Source
    carcomplaints.com
    Tagged
    #recall

    Land Rover's automonomous emergency braking (AEB) feature may be disabled without any warning light indicating there's a problem.

    The issue is believed to only affect 86 Range Rover, Range Rover Sport, and Discovery vehicles. The automaker says a driver won't know the system isn't working, a problem Land Rover says can be fixed by updating the software.

    Pro tip: never assume autonomous braking is going to work. A recall starting on November 9th will update the vehicle's software to fix the problem.

  3. Posted on
    Source
    carcomplaints.com
    Tagged
    #recall

    It's been nearly a year since the feds opened an investigation into Land Rover's door latch recall and in that time plenty of new complaints have come in.

    NHTSA has received five unique reports alleging incidents of doors opening with the SUVs in motion, then repaired by replacing the latch assemblies. One Range Rover customer was allegedly injured by a door that inadvertently opened.

    In response to NHTSA's original investigation of the 2015 recall, Land Rover discovered 43 additional complaints related to faulty door latches, with 14 of those reports alleging doors opened while driving.

    The investigation has now been upgraded which is great. You know what else would be great? Not taking a year to do something about the problem.

  4. Posted on
    Source
    carcomplaints.com
    Tagged
    #recall

    Someday the Takata problem will go away. Today is not that day.

    Land Rover is recalling more than 36,500 vehicles as part of a Takata airbag recall expansion of 3.3 million airbag inflators at risk of exploding when they deploy, even in a minor crash.

    The Jaguar and Land Rover passenger airbags are at risk of exploding due to a combination of age, moisture and the condition of the metal inflators. At least 21 people have been killed worldwide and more than 200 injured.

    The recall includes the 2010-2012 Range Rover in "Zone A" states, and the 2009-2012 Range Rover in "Zone C" states.

  5. Posted on
    Source
    carcomplaints.com
    Tagged
    #recall

    Two years ago Land Rover recalled 66,000 SUVs because their doors could fly open while driving.

    But the feds are now questioning if the recall included enough vehicles and if the software update was an adequate repair.

    To repair the problem, Land Rover dealers updated the keyless system software, but NHTSA says owners have complained about their doors opening after the recall repairs were made. Other owners report their doors opened, but their SUVs were never repaired because Land Rover didn't include all the affected vehicles in the recall.

  6. Posted on
    Source
    carcomplaints.com
    Tagged
    #recall

    The Range Rover is part of a recall of 54,340 Land Rover and Jaguar vehicles with dagerous Takata airbags.

    The recall includes about 54,340 sports sedans and SUVs that need the passenger-side airbag inflators replaced. The metal inflators are at risk of exploding because of problems with the explosive chemical ammonium nitrate.

  7. Posted on
    Source
    carcomplaints.com
    Tagged
    #recall

    Land Rover has issued a recall that should hopefully stop doors from opening unintentionally.

    Land Rover says an investigation determined there were problems with the electrical function of the keyless entry system. A short-circuit can turn the keyless entry motor into a brake and slow or stop the keyless lever from returning to its "home" position.

    This can cause a standard door closure procedure to make the latch appear to work with the striker, and the door can look to be closed but it won't be latched.

    The recall covers the 2013-2016 Range Rover and 2014-2016 Range Rover Sport manufactured before March 10, 2015.